20
09/20/2014
Played 142 times.

planarianfolk:

If you slow down the TV Tower song from Ape Escape it sounds kinda like a vaporwave track.

11401
09/19/2014
Played 74,960 times.

innocentwaif:

19
09/19/2014

planarianfolk:

This game had a pretty bangin’ soundtrack.

96637
09/19/2014

owning-my-truth:

rubyvroom:

Sorry for the extremely lengthy post on your dashes but this is so important

SHARE THIS!

67092
09/18/2014
28
09/16/2014
ohnoart:

this was a doodle but then it became not a doodle

ohnoart:

this was a doodle but then it became not a doodle

3348
09/14/2014

surasshu:

All the music from Steven and the Stevens! The songs were composed by guitar hero and storyboard artist Jeff Liu! Also super cute custom cover art by Jeff Liu!

1. The Underwater Temple
Music: Aivi & Surasshu

2. Steven and the Stevens
Music/Guitar: Jeff Liu
Lyrics: Ben Levin, Jeff Liu
Drums: Roger Hicks
Vocals: Zach Callison

3. Time Thing
Music: Aivi & Surasshu

4. Ste-Ste-Steven (Instrumental)
Music/Guitar: Jeff Liu
Drums: Roger Hicks

5. Big Fat Zucchini
Music/Guitar/Lyrics: Jeff Liu
Drums: Roger Hicks
Vocals: Zach Callison

6. Battle at the Underwater Temple
Music: Aivi & Surasshu
Electric Guitar: Edwin Rhodes
Violin: Jeff Ball

7. Steven and the Crystal Gems
Music/Guitar: Jeff Liu
Lyrics: Ben Levin, Jeff Liu
Violin: Jeff Ball
Drums: Roger Hicks
Keys: Surasshu
Vocals: Zach Callison, Michaela Dietz, Estelle, Deedee Magno Hall

1
09/11/2014

Fuck this article.

While I’m as disgusted as the next guy with the rampant bigotry and hatred surrounding the #gamergate “”“scandal”“”, I can’t really say that it’s surprising. I’ve been knee-deep in the bullshit of online communities - gaming or otherwise - for the better part of my life, and as much as I hate to admit it, none of it shocks me anymore. No, the part of all this that’s really worrying me is the reaction of the journalists and critics around it. Not the people who are trying to offer a critical look at the gaming community, who are trying to examine and rectify the toxicity in consumer and developer cultures, who are enacting change through nondestructive methods. I’m bothered by the critics and writers who write articles like this one.

It starts strong enough. Moving past the title for a moment, the first two entries on that list have fair points. The first addresses the difficulty in defining “art,” while the second deals with the issue in objectively separating games into art and non-art categories. Even the fourth entry has it’s merits - even if I disagree with the point, it argues that the interactive and explorative components that define (most) games set them apart from the tradition of art as auteur vision.* These are all good observations, and they have their own merits.

The problems arise with the third and fifth points. These complete a process that has been developing for decades, as follows:

That last category is by far the most troubling. The claims that art is dead or has ceased to be challenging are boring statements, but not offensive in and of itself. But they take on a new context when coupled with the title (“Games, stay away from art. Please”) and the closing lines: "Obsession with the question "are games art?" is a form of cultural necrophilia. Just stop it. Let’s play some games instead." In any other circumstance, that might be seen as a dismissive or flippant end to an article, but taken with the title it becomes loaded language. “Let’s play some games” or any variation of the phrase is the age old reaction to video game criticism by saying they’re just games. Every time someone argues in favor or defense of social justice in games, or diversifying the community and game characters, or changing how the community at large operates, someone trots out the argument that they’re just games in order to shut down dissent and end any hope of change or progress.

And therein is my real issue with this article. Not just that it resists social change and diversity through artistic development of games, and not just that it takes a centrist “why can’t we all just get along” non-stance. It’s that on top of those things, it paints social inaction as social action. It tries to justify apathy as saving games by preventing them from becoming boring old art, and in turn treats oppression-by-way-of-inaction as a creative revolution. It argues that art sucks because it ceases to challenge people, and then asks us all to chill out and just play some games without worrying about or criticizing them. It preaches progressiveness in games while it panders to the worst, most regressive and passive parts of the gaming community. It sucks and I hate it.

*I’m sure there are plenty of examples of non-game art that also defies that tradition. I’m not an art expert.

2964
09/10/2014
Played 31,635 times.
109
09/10/2014
Played 1,353 times.
62
09/10/2014
Played 865 times.

14e:

Clark - “Night Knuckles”

67
09/10/2014
Played 646 times.

hocotate-civ:

"Buoy Base Galaxy" from Super Mario Galaxy

57
09/09/2014

ohnogangsters:

murderections:

HEY THIS IS KIND OF IMPORTANT SO IF YOUD READ THATD BE NICE

ok ill cut to the chase: my aunt is in legal trouble for refusing to allow her ex-husband to see their 4 year old daughter because hes strongly suspected to be sexually abusing her 

my aunt has No Where Near enough money to cover her legal costs and if she goes to jail, that’d be pretty bad for her and her daughter

she’s set up this gofundme »HERE« and if you’d chip in a few bucks i’d be genuinely thankful„ 

thank u in advance

please help out shifty’s family if you can!

3
09/06/2014
Played 40 times.

sometimes i write dance music

44
08/31/2014
Played 382 times.

starbrain:

Running through the Cyber World - Mega Man Battle Network (Capcom, 2001)


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